HomeTechnologyLocked Out of ‘God Mode,’ Runners Hack Their Treadmills

Locked Out of ‘God Mode,’ Runners Hack Their Treadmills


master mentalism tricks

JD Howard just wanted to watch cloud security tutorials. Howard, a construction industry worker on sabbatical, spent $4,000 on a NordicTrack X32i treadmill, lured in by its 32-inch HD screen and the opportunity to exercise body and mind. His plan was to spend his time away from work exercising while watching technical videos from learning platforms such as Pluralsight and Udemy. But his treadmill had other ideas.

Despite having a huge display strapped to it, NordicTrack’s hardware pushes people to subscribe to exercise software operated by iFit, its parent company, and doesn’t let you watch videos from other apps or external sources. iFit’s content includes exercise classes and running routes, which automatically change the incline of the treadmill depending on the terrain on the screen. But Howard, and many other NordicTrack owners, weren’t drawn to the hardware by iFit’s videos. They were drawn in by how easy the fitness machines were to hack.

To get into his X32i, all Howard needed to do was tap the touchscreen 10 times, wait seven seconds, then tap 10 more times. Doing so unlocked the machine—letting Howard into the underlying Android operating system. This privilege mode, a sort of God mode, gave Howard complete control over the treadmill: He could sideload apps and, using a built-in browser, access anything and everything online. “It wasn’t complicated,” Howard says. After accessing privilege mode he installed a third-party browser that allowed him to save passwords and fire up his beloved cloud security videos.

While NordicTrack doesn’t advertise privilege mode as a customer feature, its existence isn’t exactly a secret. Multiple unofficial guides tell people how to get into their machines, and even iFit’s support pages explain how to access it. The whole reason Howard bought the X32i, he says, was because he could access God mode. But the good times didn’t last long.

Since October, NordicTrack has been automatically updating all of its exercise equipment—its bikes, ellipticals, and rowing machines all have big screens attached—to block access to privilege mode. The move has infuriated customers who are now fighting back and finding workarounds that allow them to bypass the update and watch whatever they want while they work out.

“I got exactly what I paid for,” Howard says, adding that he already owned a “crappy” treadmill without a screen before he purchased the internet-connected model and is also a subscriber to the iFit software. “Now they’re trying to take away [features] that are of critical importance to me. I’m not OK with that.”

Another NordicTrack owner, who asked not to be named, says the treadmill is one of the most expensive purchases he’s ever made and he was “outraged” when the update stopped him and his partner from watching Netflix, YouTube, and English Premier League football highlights while they worked out. “You’ve actually pushed an update to stop me from doing this, which is really bizarre,” he says. “It’s so frustrating because this beautiful screen is here.”

“We need to rebalance the rights so that consumers, if they actually have bought a product, have full control over it.”

Ugo Vallauri, The Restart Project

They aren’t alone in their complaints. In recent weeks multiple threads and posts lamenting NordicTrack and iFit’s decision to lock down privilege mode have appeared online. Customers complain that they’ve spent thousands of dollars on their machines and should be able to do what they like with them, many arguing that being able to watch their favorite shows means they’re more likely to spend time working out. Some say they valued the ability to cast iFit’s exercise videos onto a bigger screen; other say they want to use their treadmills for Zoom calls. Many complain that, in contrast to previous software updates, the one to block privilege mode was forced upon them.

“The block on privilege mode was automatically installed because we believe it enhances security and safety while using fitness equipment that has multiple moving parts,” says a spokesperson for NordicTrack and iFit. The company has never marketed its products as being able to access other apps, the spokesperson adds. “As there is no way of knowing what kind of changes or errors a consumer could introduce into the software, there is no way of knowing what specific issues accessing privilege mode might cause,” the spokesperson says. “Therefore, to maintain security, safety, and machine functionality, we have restricted access to privilege mode.” The spokesperson also emphasizes that privilege mode was “never designed as a consumer-facing functionality.” Rather, it was designed to allow the company’s customer service team to remotely access the products to “troubleshoot, update, reset, or repair our software.”

Read The Full Article Here


trick photography
Advertisingfutmillion

Popular posts

Hollywood Spotlight: Director Jon Frenkel Garcia
The Dutchman Cast: André Holland, Zazie Beetz & More Join
The Creator Reactions: Gareth Edwards’ Latest Is One of 2023’s
Company Paid Critics For Rotten Tomatoes Reviews
Meet the Soccer Stars Playing the Dating Field in New
Alison Sweeney Teases One Bad Apple: A Hannah Swensen Mystery,
Leslie Knope & Michael Scott: How Two Very Different Bosses
Mindy Kaling Makes Hulu Return With New York City-Set Comedy
Greye is Back With New Album
Universal Dice’s “Curse”
Society of the Silver Cross’ “Wife of the Sea”
Bill McBirnie’s Reflections (For Paul Horn) 
9 Boob Tapes That Work For All Busts, Shapes, and
Here’s Why Apple Cider Vinegar Is the Ingredient Your Hair
I Travel a Lot for Work—These Are the Useful Items
The Best Street Style Looks From the Fall 2023 Couture
7 New Manga Releases to Enjoy in April 2024
No Preview
Never Lie: Ending & Explanations
Ad Man Reflects on Industry, Innovation and a Life Well
April Will Shower You With These New Comics and Graphic
Worm-like amphibian produces a kind of milk for its hatchlings
Blueprint for mandating indoor air quality for public buildings in
Simple Resistance Exercises Improve Overall Health and Reduce Death Risks
Contributors to Scientific American’s April 2024 Issue
Killing TikTok
Comedy or Tragedy?
BYD Atto 3 Electric SUV With Blade Battery Technology Launched
Bitcoin Falls to $19,000 in Anticipation of Tighter Fed Policy