HomeScienceDeep-sea rockfish that live to be 200 hint at genes

Deep-sea rockfish that live to be 200 hint at genes


master mentalism tricks

Longevity research often focuses on short-lived lab animals like mice – but a study of long-lived rockfish might offer new genetic clues for extending lifespans

Life 11 November 2021

By Aimee Gabay

A rockfish (genus Sebastes) in captivity in California

Jurgen Freund/Nature Picture Library/Alamy

Rockfish are among the longest-living animals known to exist, and by studying the natural variation in their lifespans, researchers have discovered key insights into the genetic basis of longevity.

Studies into ageing have traditionally focused on laboratory mice because they are easy to work with. However, Peter Sudmant at the University of California, Berkeley, and his colleagues adopted a different approach, studying longevity in creatures with longer lifespans.

The researchers performed a genomic analysis of 88 species of Pacific Ocean rockfish (genus Sebastes) – deep-sea creatures that live between 11 and 200 years – to map out the genetic underpinnings of their lifespans. They accounted for factors such as body size and their environment, which are variables that are known to affect ageing in many organisms.

Advertisement

“We found genes associated with many different pathways — genes involved in DNA repair, metabolism and immune response,” says Sudmant. It is possible that a set of genes called butyrophilins, which are known to influence many human diseases of inflammation, contribute to the extreme lifespan of long-lived rockfishes.

“We found that these genes, which we think play an immunosuppressive role, have higher ‘copy number’ [meaning some have been duplicated] in ultra-long-lived species,” says Sudmant. “This highlights a specific set of genes and pathways that might be important to follow up in humans.”

An investigation into the lives of these long-lived animals is critical to learning how to enhance and prolong human health, says Steven Austad at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “I don’t believe we will make much headway in extending human health if we only study short-lived organisms like fruit flies and mice.”

Journal reference: Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.abg5332

More on these topics:

Read The Full Article Here


trick photography
Advertisingfutmillion

Popular posts

‘Murder Mystery 2’ Trailer: Sandler and Aniston, Back on the
Eddie Murphy Wants to Make ‘Shrek 5’ or a Donkey
Invincible Season 2 Teaser Trailer Sets Release Date Window
YOLO: Silver Destiny Interview: Michael Cusack, Todor Manojlovic, & Sarah
TNets Push ‘Lazarus Project,’ ‘Miracle Workers’ Premieres
Speaking ‘Truth’ to Power, ‘Real Time’ and ‘Game Theory’ Back
Good Wife Spinoff, Matlock Series Starring Kathy Bates Among CBS
Major League Wrestling Finds a New Home on Reelz
Duval Timothy Shares New Video for “First Rain”
Unknown Mortal Orchestra Detail New Album V, Share Video for
Fatima Al Qadiri Announces New Gumar EP, Shares New Song
Future, Missy Elliott, the Roots, Glorilla, and More to Perform
Hailey Bieber Short Hair: Bieber Spent Weeks Thinking About Cutting
Anne Hathaway Dancing at Valentino Proves That Hathaway Is Thriving
These Rollerball Perfumes Smell Intoxicatingly Good (and Are Carry-On Approved)
I’m a Style Expert, and These 12 New-Season Buys Have
Interview with T.W. Pearce, Author of Forbitten Fae
Book Riot’s Deals of the Day for February 2, 2023
Deliciously Disturbing and Addictive Sequel to ‘River of Ashes’
Books & Looks Podcast: Bad City, The Dark Side of
Microparticles could help prevent vitamin A deficiency: Fortifying foods with
Are Quantum Computers about to Break Online Privacy?
Compound reverses gut inflammation in mice
NASA’s Orion capsule captures gorgeous close-up pictures of the moon
Watch the Trailer for The Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday
The Best USB Flash Drives for Ultra-Portable Storage
Apple Asks Suppliers to Decarbonise, Announces New Clean Energy Investments
Bitcoin Breaks Above $20,000 as Investors Turn to Riskier Assets